Why You Should Have Personal Goals

How do you measure personal success?

The corporate world is awash with KPIs (Key Performance Indicators), objectives and targets and usually these are aligned with business strategy and are designed to measure company performance against its expectations as a means of judging how successful the business is.

What is less publicised are personal goals of individuals who work at these organisations and contribute to the corporate success. For every organisational objective that is reached there are tens, hundreds or thousands of individual personal goals that are achieved by the employees doing the bread and butter of the business really well. This could be anything from securing a lucrative new client or resolving a customer complaint.

Personal goals at work

Not only does everyone have professional work related business objectives they are working towards on a daily basis, we all have many things in personal lives we would like to achieve. What are yours? To get married, to have children, running a marathon or just getting out of bed in the morning? Some people have the written down in their diaries, some share them with the friends and family, but most people just keep them in their heads. Often these work fine, but if you don’t tell anyone else about them, how can they help you achieve it? And if you’re like me, and you just keep them in your head then it’s likely you might forget them.

Achieving personal goals

Isn’t it time that you took your own personal success more seriously?

At First Response our managers provide the tools, techniques and opportunity to our employees to create engaging, achievable and challenging professional and individual personal goals for themselves and provide support along their journey. We know that ambitious, determined and successful employees who are achieving their own personal goals outside of work are likely to be equally successful in work too and vice versa.

It might be worth having a think about what your personal goals are? How will you measure success? Is your manager really invested in the outcome?

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